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Iris Plants

iris
AcomaAcoma
Mager 90 EM TB 34 in. AM
Wide graceful flowers. Sky Blue wide standards with darker blue-violet plicata markings on ruffled ivory falls. Order now while supplies last.

1002: $12.50Sale: $11.88
ActressActress
Keppel 76 EM TB 35 in. AM
The actress will amaze you with its dazzling color of spring wisteria, its wonderfully wild tucks and ruffles and of course, its unique tangerine beards. The new glamour and trendsetting flair of this top quality performer is designed to flatter.

1008: $12.50Sale: $11.88
Aegean StarAegean Star
Plough 72 EM TB 30 in. HM
This colorful mosaic involves an exhuberant marriage of deep violet plicata, pure white ground, and violet beards. A look that is uniquely different in expression of color and design. What a great way to create a splash in your garden this spring!

1011: $12.50Sale: $8.99
Afternoon DelightAfternoon Delight
Ernst 85 M TB 36 in. AM
In a soothing desert palette with honey tanned standards infused with lavender. The Afternoon Delight provides a simple statement of style and grace. The subtle elegance is sure to delight all your guests.

1014: $11.75Sale: $11.16
AltruistAltruist
Schreiner 87 EM TB 37 in. AM
Provides an oh-so luxurious look with its ruffled and fluted cool azure, and lightening to chalk white around midrib and beards. This graceful and fresh presence is one not to be forgotten.

1020: $12.50Sale: $11.88
Amber SnowAmber Snow
Blyth 87 E TB 36 in.
With a ruffled amonena, pure white standards, amber apricot falls, and bright tangerine beards, Amber Snow offers a hint of sophistication, romance, and simplicity for all those with such impeccable tastes.

1026: $12.50Sale: $11.88
AphrodisiacAphrodisiac
Schreiner 86 M TB 36 in. HM
The lightly ruffled petals with the luscious shaded apricot underside, will dazzle any garden or back yard setting. This finely sculptured iris and shining pearl luster will cater to your garden fantasy of sophistication and mystique.

1029: $12.50Sale: $11.88
At DawnAt Dawn
R & L Miller 88 EM TB 29 in.
The sun-spun colours of this perennial are highly reminiscent of spring and the vitality that it brings. With a vibrant burst of lemon yellow standards, a slightly deeper color where it falls, and the rich aureolin yellow hafts and beards, this bulb will provide just the zest and vigor that your garden needs.

1035: $12.50Sale: $11.88
Aztec DanceAztec Dance
Blyth 80 M TB 34 in.
The rustic, time-honored beauty of cream standards, white falls, violet plicata borders and yellow beards of the Aztec Dance iris, yeild a fabulous mix of color and texture to create the perfect summertime classic for your backyard garden.

1038: $12.50Sale: $11.88
Babbling BrookBabbling Brook
Keppel 66 m TB 38 in. DM, AM, HM
This delicate looking iris creates a beautiful, subtle palette with light blue petals and light yellow beards. It does very well with lot's of light and will be the perfect addition of fresh spring and easter colors to any garden.

1041: $12.50Sale: $11.88
Barefoot BoyBarefoot Boy
M TB 36 in.
Light blue standards and falls. Vigorous grower. This is an aggressive grower that is virtually carefree and can hold its own against weeds. An older variety but one with lots of crowd appeal and road site viewability. Excellent for bank stabilization. We have used it on steep sandy ridges to hold the soil. Iris are useful for many things!

1406$9.99
BeckonBeckon
Daling 74 M TB 40 in.
A rhythm of color involving rosy violet and purple plicata on pure white with yellow beards. This plant maintains a vigorous growth rate and is striking in any combination of vibrant perennials.

1050$12.00, 3/$20.00, 5/$29.00
Best BetBest Bet
Schrenier 88 E TB 36 in. AM, HM
With light wisteria blue standards gently contrasting against the deep hyacinth falls, this classic beauty is a display of all around excellence. Named for its outstanding qualities of flourishing growth habits, the Best Bet is sure to be the most thriving grace of your garden.

1053: $12.50Sale: $11.88
RebloomersRebloomers
For a list of reblooming iris please visit our infor page on rebloomers, their reliablity in zones at Rebloomers Society

rebloom
Click to enlargeWater Iris
Mystic LaceMystic Lace
Lightly ruffled blue lavender standards with royal blue to purple falls.

401: $12.00Sale: $11.04
Pink EncorePink Encore
Pink Encore is one of the pinkest of pink tall bearded iris. Real pretty.

303: $12.00Sale: $11.04
Laced CottenLaced Cotten
Laced Cotton is a tall bearded iris with real class. Frilled and laced standards and graceful ruffled falls make it a showpiece for any garden.

307: $12.00Sale: $11.04
Maroon MaidenMaroon Maiden
Maroon Maiden casts a spell with it intense mysterious mauve-purple aura. Your garden is resplendent with this winner.

309: $12.00Sale: $11.04
VillanVillan
Villan is that rare blend of unique majesty and regal splendor that every garden desperately needs. A certain devlish aloofness puts this iris in a class of its own.Falls are royal purple with a cream edging and deep creamy gold.

310: $12.00Sale: $11.04
Thai OrangeThai Orange
Thai Orange exhibits unique texture and a rosy orange that stands apart from its other iris cousins. Falls are orange and standards oranger if possible!

312: $12.00Sale: $11.04
Inland PassageInland Passage
Gaulter 1986 Violet blue with white beards reminds you of a misty sea voyage with towering Norweigan fiords and a North Atlantic emotion in the summer. Beauty!

313: $12.00Sale: $11.04
Ruby TuesdayRuby Tuesday

Ruby Tuesday

(W. Maryott 1992)

Awards: American Iris Society Honorable Mention 1995



Carmel flowers with slightly ruffled, velvet like ruby falls edged with a rim of caramel. Thick yellow veins surround the matching bi-color beards.

Height (6-12in) Blooms: early to mid season.

Ruby-Tuesday$12.00
Iris Flowers 2nd Grouping
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| 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | View All Iris



Purple Emperor Spuria Purple Emperor Spuria

Most Exquisite Iris - Spuria

We have been growing these for about 7 years and though I hate to sell them, I must. They are the most majestic of al the iris growing tall and stately, with a flower much like the Bird of Paradise and clear brilliant colors. They take awhile to get established but well worth it in the end. They provide spectacular display after the tall bearded iris and before daylilies start the summer parade of colors.
Spuria are beardless iris, originating from the Mediterranean area of Europe. They are also seen in lesser numbers in England, Denmark, Russia, Afghanistan and western China. Spuria iris are one of the tallest of iris, reaching a height of 5 feet or more. Experience has shown that spuria iris perform better in areas of the country where the summer months are dry.

Spuria irises are classified under the Apogon or beardless subsection of the iris family. The twenty or more species are native to the temperate zone in a band running from Spain and North Africa to India and China . The greatest collection of the species has been found in southernSiberia , always in sunny locations.

The largest concentration of activity in growing and hybridizing spurias is in the sunnier and warmer parts of the U.S. , especially California and the Southwest, including Texas and Missouri , and in eastern Australia , but they have also been grown successfully in Montana and Minnesotaas well as in northern Europe.

When to Plant:

Spuria are dug in the fall before they start showing signs of new growth. Rhizomes must be washed well and placed damp in a plastic bag for storage in the refrigerator, NOT in the freezer. Plant as soon as possible. Where to Plant: Spuria thrive in full sun best, but will do well on half a day’s sun throughout the year. They will tolerate partial shade, especially in areas that have extremely high temperatures in the summer. Soil Preparation: Spuria prefer a neutral to slightly alkaline soil and they must have good drainage. Enrich soil by adding alfalfa and manure (see more about manure below). Heavier clay soil is much better than fine sandy soil.

Basic Planting Steps:

Some spuria are difficult to establish. Basically spuria need water, manure (see more about manure below), and mulch to become established. Begin the planting by making sure the soil will allow for good drainage and is enriched. Then make a hole about two inches below the surface. Add fertilizer (14-14-14 is suggested) to this hole. Then put lots of water into this hole. Finally add the rhizome, cover with soil and mulch. Watering this new spuria rhizome from the top of the soil is not sufficient for establishing a clump. Mulch spuria the first year of growth. Saw dust is the best mulch to use. After the clump is established, the mulch may be removed during the blooming season.

Distance Apart:

Space spuria far enough apart to grow in the same location for years as Spuria irises resent being transplanted. Spacing spuria rhizomes three feet apart is suggested.

Watering:

Water regularly from October through the bloom season until about July 1st. However do not let them sit in pools of water. During the hot summer, spuria can be allowed to go dormant by withholding water. If spuria do go dormant, be sure NOT to water as this will cause rot. Too much moisture combined with summer heat causes rot that damages the new growth.

Foliage of the summer-dormant types can be cut back to the ground for garden neatness after the foliage dies down about the first of August without harming the plant growth.

spuriapurple$22.00
White Inca Spuria IrisWhite Inca Spuria Iris

Most Exquisite Iris - Spuria

We have been growing these for about 7 years and though I hate to sell them, I must. They are the most majestic of al the iris growing tall and stately, with a flower much like the Bird of Paradise and clear brilliant colors. They take awhile to get established but well worth it in the end. They provide spectacular display after the tall bearded iris and before daylilies start the summer parade of colors.

The white are about 4-5 feet high. Spuria are beardless iris, originating from the Mediterranean area of Europe. They are also seen in lesser numbers in England, Denmark, Russia, Afghanistan and western China. Spuria iris are one of the tallest of iris, reaching a height of 5 feet or more. Experience has shown that spuria iris perform better in areas of the country where the summer months are dry.

Spuria irises are classified under the Apogon or beardless subsection of the iris family. The twenty or more species are native to the temperate zone in a band running from Spain and North Africa to India and China . The greatest collection of the species has been found in southernSiberia , always in sunny locations.

The largest concentration of activity in growing and hybridizing spurias is in the sunnier and warmer parts of the U.S. , especially California and the Southwest, including Texas and Missouri , and in eastern Australia , but they have also been grown successfully in Montana and Minnesotaas well as in northern Europe.

When to Plant:

Spuria are dug in the fall before they start showing signs of new growth. Rhizomes must be washed well and placed damp in a plastic bag for storage in the refrigerator, NOT in the freezer. Plant as soon as possible. Where to Plant: Spuria thrive in full sun best, but will do well on half a day’s sun throughout the year. They will tolerate partial shade, especially in areas that have extremely high temperatures in the summer. Soil Preparation: Spuria prefer a neutral to slightly alkaline soil and they must have good drainage. Enrich soil by adding alfalfa and manure (see more about manure below). Heavier clay soil is much better than fine sandy soil.

Basic Planting Steps:

Some spuria are difficult to establish. Basically spuria need water, manure (see more about manure below), and mulch to become established. Begin the planting by making sure the soil will allow for good drainage and is enriched. Then make a hole about two inches below the surface. Add fertilizer (14-14-14 is suggested) to this hole. Then put lots of water into this hole. Finally add the rhizome, cover with soil and mulch. Watering this new spuria rhizome from the top of the soil is not sufficient for establishing a clump. Mulch spuria the first year of growth. Saw dust is the best mulch to use. After the clump is established, the mulch may be removed during the blooming season.

Distance Apart:

Space spuria far enough apart to grow in the same location for years as Spuria irises resent being transplanted. Spacing spuria rhizomes three feet apart is suggested.

Watering:

Water regularly from October through the bloom season until about July 1st. However do not let them sit in pools of water. During the hot summer, spuria can be allowed to go dormant by withholding water. If spuria do go dormant, be sure NOT to water as this will cause rot. Too much moisture combined with summer heat causes rot that damages the new growth.

Foliage of the summer-dormant types can be cut back to the ground for garden neatness after the foliage dies down about the first of August without harming the plant growth.

White Inca Spuria Iris
spuriawhie$22.00
Honky Tonk BluesHonky Tonk Blues
Schreiner 88 ML TB 37 in. HM
Distinctive ruffling with blending shades of blue and white. Blue violet is streaked with swirling white etching. Well branched strong stems.

1227: $12.50Sale: $9.99
SummerSaleSummerSale
Sum12


Plants you may also be interested in ...
CabernetCabernet
Hager 82 M 34 in.
Deep red wine with even deeper styles and white veined signals. Nice erect foliage and good color. This is a perennial favorite that really grows well year after year!

Cabernet
5022: $10.00Sale: $9.50
Afternoon DelightAfternoon Delight
Ernst 85 M TB 36 in. AM
In a soothing desert palette with honey tanned standards infused with lavender. The Afternoon Delight provides a simple statement of style and grace. The subtle elegance is sure to delight all your guests.

1014: $11.75Sale: $11.16
ExhuberantExhuberant
Mohr 81 EM TB 32 in. AM
Standards orange, falls white with precise orange border. Petals ruffled and falls flared.

1170: $12.50Sale: $11.88
| 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | View All Iris

All About Iris

Irises are wonderful garden plants. You can certainly find some that will grow for you, if you just give them light. Some grow in deserts, some in swamps, some in the cold far north, and many in temperate climates. Iris means rainbow, and that's because irises come in so many colors: blues and purples, whites and yellows, pinks and oranges, browns and reds, and even blacks.

The Genus Iris The genus Iris and related genera Linnaeus placed a great variety of plants in the genus Iris and a great number of species have been added since his time, the total now being over two or three hundred species. Later classifications have removed many species into separate genera and divided the species remaining in the genus Iris into sections and other subclassifications. By the ninetheenth century botanists had created new genera such as Evansia, Hermodactylus, Moraea, Oncocyclus, and Xiphion. Opinion was divided whether to split the genus into several parts or lump them back into Iris. For instance, J. G. Baker separated some such as Moraea and Xiphion from Iris in his Handbook of the Irideae published in London in 1892.

W. R. Dykes clarified the situation by a compromise in his monograph The Genus Iris (Cambridge University Press, 1913; reprinted in 1974 by Dover). Some groupings of species previously made separate genera became sections within the genus Iris. These included Evansia, Oncocyclus, and Xiphion. (Dykes further divided some of these sections of Iris into groups of species.) Others groupings of species remained outside the genus. The Snake's Head Iris, which Linnaeus had called Iris tuberosa, was left in the genus Hermodactylus, and the many moreas (south African irises) placed in Iris by Linnaeus remained the genus Moraea.

L. Diels' classification of the Iridaceae (in Engles and Prantl's Die Naturlichen Pflanzenfamilien, 1930) updated Dykes classification. Subsections were named in the Apogon section (beardless irises).

G. H. M. Lawrence reclassified irises in 1953. An updated classification by Randolph appears in Garden Irises (L. F. Randolph, editor; A. I. S. 1959). Dykes' sections and subsections were shifted up and down into subgenera, sections, subsections, and series, but no irises were shifted into or out of the genus Iris. This classification is used by the American Iris Society.

Rodionenko's 1961 reclassification in The Genus Iris (in Russian, Moscow, 1961) was more ambitious in that he split the genus into five genera: Iris (includes rhyzomatous irises), Xiphium (bulbous irises like Dutch and English irises), Iridodictyum (bulbous irises like reticulata), Gynandriris (just what Linnaeus called Iris sisyrinchium), and Juno (bulbous Juno irises). Below is a summary of Rodionenko's classification of Iris, the other four genera mentioned above, and Hermodactylus. In this classification, a genus may be divided into subgenera, a subgenus into sections, a section into subsections, and a subsection into series. Several species may be included in a series.
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